Facing overwhelming opposition from the fishing community, the Coalition for a Sustainable Delta—aka, a group of irrigators hoping to divert more water—this week revoked its controversial petition for regulation changes on striped and black bass in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta.

Yellowstone Park
Yellowstone Park

Anyone who's ever spent a season working in a national park will relate to Fong's heartfelt recollections. And for anyone considering it, this story helps illustrate how hard it can sometimes be to re-enter the real world. From the second issue of The Drake, Fong reminds us that fiction often speaks the greater truth.

The IGFA calls Steve Huff "the most well-respected guide in the history of flats fishing." In Andy Mill's book, A Passion for Tarpon, he calls Huff "bar none, the best tarpon guide alive, the best there was and the best there ever will be." Though he spent the first half of his career guiding the Lower Keys, Huff has spent the past twenty years in the Everglades, where long-time Drake contributor Monte Burke caught up with him for a day of backcountry tarpon fishing.

Smoky Mountain Brook Trout
Smoky Mountain Brook Trout

In 2015, the Park Service opened all of what were once known as "red line" brookie streams in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In doing so, it endorsed both anglers and trout. It is now the official policy of the United States to let these Appalachian natives be their own brookie selves. Contributor Zach Matthews notes that it's also up to anglers not to mess this up.

Washington's Olympic National Park is best known for iconic steelhead rivers such as the Hoh, Bogachiel, and Sol Duc. It's also home to America's largest dam removal project, which was completed on the now free-flowing Elwha River in August 2014. Here, contributor Brian Irwin recounts his days pouring drinks in the park and exploring a river that "courses through the temperate rainforest amid Paleozoic-sized ferns before crashing into the sea."

The Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks today implemented an immediate closure of all water-based recreation (fishing, wading, floating, tubing, boating, etc.) on the Yellowstone River and its tributaries from Yellowstone National Park’s northern boundary at Gardiner to the Highway 212 bridge in Laurel—stretches totaling more than 183 miles of river.