There are a few ways to see and swing northern British Columbia's legendary Babine River this fall. And while most of them involve a mortgage-size down payment followed by a heli ride to your majestic riverside digs, there's now a glimmer of hope for the budget-oriented dirtbags in the crowd—assuming we can scrounge up a hundred bucks for a raffle ticket and a good cause.

While steelhead and chinook salmon fisheries remain a question mark across the Columbia River Basin, a bronzeback boon will keep anglers in the hunt during this raging high-water season. And an extra cooler, along with some eggs and flour, should feature prominently in your kit.

Clear rivers and one's right to wade them in search of swirling trout have always been, in the great state of Montana, prerogatives worth fighting to keep. Now more than forty of Montana’s best writers have unholstered their pens to bring original essays and testimonials to the battle, advocating for the protection of public lands and endorsing Democratic House of Representatives candidate Rob Quist’s position on an issue of indispensable value to anglers.

A new forecast halving the expected return of spring chinook to the Columbia River and its tributaries led Washington to close Snake River salmon fishing earlier this week. The spring chinook return to the entire Columbia-Snake River Basin this season was predicted to be 160,800. It's now been cut to 83,000 and recreational fishing has been closed above and below Bonneville Dam near Portland. Upstream in Idaho, the chinook fishery has also been cancelled. And steelhead aren't faring much better, with just 825 wild adult B-runs expected to pass through the lower Snake River in 2017. Historically, Snake steelhead numbered 1 million fish, with the most recent 10-year average at 30,982.

From our friends at Simms: "Born and raised in Montana, first and second generation Wader Makers Leona and Michelle Helvey reflect on family, fishing, and a mother/daughter bond that continues to help them get through sad times." Watch the vid, then go give your mom a hug.

After months of negotiations, this week Florida Gov. Rick Scott signed into law a bill that could help reverse the 40-year ecosystem decline occurring in the Florida Everglades. SB10, sponsored by Sen. Rob Bradley, will fund the creation of a 78-billion gallon deep-water reservoir (enough water-holding capacity to fill 120,000 Olympic-size swimming pools) south of Lake Okeechobee.