Back Issue Content: 2016

2016

Seeking Refuge

Inside Arctic Alaska with Soul River Runs Deep

CHAD BROWN, the Navy veteran who spawned the Soul River Runs Deep brand, looks like he's just fought the battle of his life. And it's no surprise he's beat. A glance at my watch shows 3 a.m. Alaska time and Brown, along with his squad of vet volunteers here to herd a posse of bedraggled inner-city teens, is currently erecting camp on the banks of the Eagle River, a few miles outside of Anchorage.

The Reunion. Re-meeting Jeff Cottrell

Re-meeting Jeff Cottrell

FOR MANY YEARS after I met Jeff Cottrell, I would have said that SoCal's Bear Creek was the best small stream I've ever fished. A secretive tributary of the San Gabriel River not far from the troubled sprawl of the L.A. basin, it was the kind of place only fishing kids knew about. Nettles, rattlesnakes, tarantulas, scorpions, and despairingly steep canyon walls helped to ensure light traffic, and alder and willow overhanging the creek served as vexing deterrents to fly casters. A few miles upstream from the confluence with the West Fork, away from the mainstem and its deformed hatchery trout, you got into the good fishing.

The Adirondack Experience

An informal search for native brookies leads the author to something more

A few years ago, I was sitting on the porch of a house I no longer live in, venting to a friend about "too much work, not enough fishing." I told him I wanted to fish again, and said I knew just the guy to get me back on the water. The porch had great sunset views of a national park, but I didn't get to enjoy them very often; I was traveling for business nearly every day of the month. On the occasions I was there, I spent most of my time on that porch, in the evening as the sun went down, drinking an IPA named for a local mountain range where Cochise, the Chiricahua Apache Chief, is buried. Usually I was reading, and often the book was a narrative on flyfishing.

Forecasting Fish

BC Steelhead and the Tyee Test Fishery

IT STARTS AROUND THE SAME TIME every year, in late June or early July. And on a day that you should be fishing, you're instead making furtive mouse clicks and talking in hushed tones with your buddies, always reminding yourselves that it's still too early to say anything definitive. Then, as trout fishing ebbs into its August doldrums, you start acting more like a day trader than a fisherman, poring over graphs and projecting trends like you're an extra in The Big Short.

Ignore the tails, and keep on filming

IN MARCH OF 2016, C1 films released a permit movie called t. Falcatus Ch. 1: Day of Days. The film opens with Nathaniel Linville, owner of The Angling Company fly shop in Key West, giving viewers advice: "I recommend anyone who's watching this, turn the volume down; I got nothing interesting to say."