Daily Drake

Truths will be revealed, inside your box

Riverbound anglers of earth, no doubt, love their flies. This is especially true for trout guys, who have more than most. The origins of this obsession can be traced back to the caddis hatch on River X. Around dark, the wriggling tent-winged insects begin to take flight. Around the same time, the trout in the river begin to get hungry. This isn’t a casual affair. Those rainbows and browns are generally well-fed, making them particularly particular; they want their caddis served just the right size, and delivered in just the right shade of smoky-whole-wheat. In order to procure a strike from the bastards, the savvy angler produces a box of highly-considered magic.

Andy Anderson's photography goes well beyond the flyfishing microcosm. And all of it is well worth a look. Here the lens is reversed and the renowned shooter shares some of his thoughts and philosophies about the art form to which he's dedicated his life. Presented by: YETI and Orvis.

A reporter's notebook

THE RED LIGHT ON MY DESK PHONE WAS BLINKING. I hate when it blinks first thing in the morning. It usually means somebody has called to tell me I’m stupid. People love to hate their local newspaper, and they love to call reporters and tell them about it. My voicemail is rarely good.

Bureau of Reclamation Deputy Commissioner Alan Mikkelsen has made it clear that the Interior Department will not try to scrub what’s slated to be the largest river restoration project in U.S. history—the removal of four hydroelectric dams from the 236-mile Klamath River starting in 2020.

Forty five days and a thousand miles into his self-propelled journey from western Canada to coastal Mexico, Brian Ohlen caught a steelhead in California. In between all those pedal strokes and casts, he makes a case for preserving public river and stream access in this strong short from BlackburnMedia.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is greenlighting a reclassification of about 80 percent of Wyoming’s recreational waterways. The move from a primary- to secondary-contact designation means that the streams in question are no longer recommended sites for fishing, swimming, or recreation in general. The change also means those waterways can now house levels of e. coli five time higher than what was allowed under their former classification.

As part of their annual Tailer's Ball event, the team at Flood Tide Co has gathered works from some of the best artists in the biz for a silent art auction that'll help pitch funds toward Hurricane Harvey relief and restoration efforts in Texas.

David Letterman once said that fall is his favorite season in LA, "watching the birds change color and fall from the trees." In truth, LA is one of those seasonless anomalies. Which means you can jump off a train and fish mako, carp, and calico bass in a day—pretty much any day. Watch Jeremi get it done in Redington's latest FYW vid: 24 Hours in LA.