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The Balance, a new film from Orvis, traverses the Everglades ecosystem and explains how increased storage, treatment, and conveyance of water south of Lake Okeechobee would benefit fisheries across southern Florida. Text WATER to 52866, and tell Florida's leaders to support SB10 and HB761 and to build the EAA Reservoir, which would restore the flow of fresh, clean water to the River of Grass.

MORNING ON THE MISSOURI. PHOTO BY BRIAN GROSSENBACHER

Sometimes you find the fish; sometimes they find you.

Mid-June after a May-long drought and, weeks before we thought they would, the rivers had begun to "take shape," an idiom I've always loved for its suggestions of primal formation and rebirth. What was just days prior a brown blob squirming primordially down from Rogers' Pass is suddenly the jade-green Blackfoot, its boulders and riffly musculature apparent and alluring, the bankside willows laden with salmonflies three whole weeks before the bar-sidled, self-proclaimed experts—myself included—had anticipated. Why hadn't the bugs consulted us before emerging?

Unexpected Journey

COMPARED TO THE INITIAL REPORT, our weather wasn't looking so bad. Wind was steady at eight or nine knots out of the northwest, pushing temps down to the mid-forties. The water had cooled significantly over the last week, and reports of trout and reds still being around were spotty and unsubstantiated. Our odds weren't good. Still, life had placed us here, with a boat, some fly rods, and a little extra time. Who cares about odds anyway?

The curious case of Fly Fishing Collaborative

"Gaining a good network of supporters is critical to the life of any new NGO, and in this day and age people can be very leery of supporting any non-profit; not everyone out there is completely sincere in their fundraising efforts."
—Bucky Buchstaber,
from the opening paragraph to his story,
"Fly Fishing Collaborative in South Africa,"
in Revive: A Fly Fishing Journal, fall 2016.

Kinda like Midwestern school teachers, with wings

CHASING HATCHES IS STUPID and obnoxious. I know. I've tried. Pursuing particular insects insures that the potential for disappointment will dwarf the likelihood of success. If us fishing media folk are to be believed (also a bad idea), fishing is an appreciation of the moment, being present, or some other Baba Ram Das shit. Planning for, and expecting to control, something as ephemeral as when bugs emerge from the water just seems arrogant and maybe a little entitled.