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EPA moves to scrap Pebble Mine restrictions

The proposed Pebble Mine, subject of 20 years of controversy, 2.2 million public comments, a dozen Congressional hearings, multiple documentary films, media campaigns, ballot initiatives, lawsuits, and the most ubiquitous sticker in all of fishingdom, is back on the table. Seemingly the result of one 30-minute meeting between two men: EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and Pebble CEO Tom Collier.

The DrakeCast Fly Fishing Podcast Russell Pedersen Fly Fishing Horseshoes & Hand Grenades Ryan Sparks

Carp aren't native to the US, but at this point, they're here to stay. This episode follows the meteoric rise of the nation's number one trashfish and how folks with flyrods began targetting them. During this story we'll hear the musical stylings of the carp loving crew that makes up the string band, Horseshoes & Hand Grenades. 

Tom Morgan may be gone, but his philosophy isn’t.

Walk into the Bozeman offices of Tom Morgan Rodsmiths and an immaculate bamboo rod greets you. Natural yellow. Maroon wrappings. Agate guides. Fluid action. It’s stunning.

Can commercial netting coexist with Columbia River salmon recovery?

A Pound net is a wall of netting that stretches from the shoreline out into a river, funneling fish into a compartment called the “heart,” where fish are trapped but not killed. The nets were once common on the Columbia River, but were banned in Washington State in 1936 for being too effective. Commercial fisherman Blair Peterson had petitioned Washington and Oregon for more than a decade to build a pound net on the Columbia as a monitoring tool. His efforts were dismissed until the Wild Fish Conservancy took notice.

“They saw what this trap was capable of, as a selective harvest tool, and they were able to play ball with the state where I wasn’t,” Peterson says. “WFC stepped in with the technology and resources to help.”

From Alaska to the Keys, the on-the-water epidemic is real

It all started several decades ago in Alaska. I was a newbie guide, hoping to land a nice tip. So, when my clients asked if they could spend the morning bonking sockeye spawners, completely ignoring the egg-crazed bows bouncing off their waders, I obliged. The guys quickly reeled in their limits, but then refused to stop. That’s when I looked over and saw another sockeye cart-wheeling downstream, and that’s when I also noticed something odd. The client “playing” the fish was holding the rod by its detachable fighting butt, instead of by the cork handle. Before I could offer any guide-worthy advice, the whole setup launched out of his grip.