Daily Drake

British Columbia's Thompson River has this fall seen steelhead trickle in at the lowest numbers ever recorded. With roughly 250 spawners projected for 2018, the fishery is on the brink. That's why four groups—B.C. Wildlife Federation, Steelhead Society of B.C., B.C. Federation of Fly Fishers, and B.C. Federation of Drift Fishers—are calling on Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the provincial government to recognize the crisis and to develop a plan to get us out of it. You can help by signing the petition, below.

Our good friend Gray Struznik—this guy—is more than just a fisherman, he's also an unbelievable mathemagician. He's been crunching numbers and has come up with a solution to limit his and his clients' footprint on Olympic Peninsula steelhead rivers: something called the Slow Down. Check out what Struznik's been up to, and don't forget to please support your local steelhead conservation organizations. Via Sage.

Lord of the ChumDogz

In a recent instagram post by fisheries biologist John R. McMillan (@rainforest_steel), the wild salmonid crusader emphasized a little-known necessity for a healthy salmon river. Check out the full text below.

Nearly two months after the Cypress Island spill sent more than 100,000 unasked for Atlantic salmon into Puget Sound waters, Washington's salmon farming industry continues to blunder along—big time. Recent headlines reveal an attempt at bribery, evidence of another pen on the brink of collapse, and a permit approval from the state for juvenile Atlantic salmon to be transferred into that very pen.

Dick Goin remembers the Elwha. After migrating to Washington's Olympic Peninsula during the Dust Bowl, it was the river and its abundant salmon runs that helped sustain his family. In the award-winning documentary The Memory of Fish (2016), now touring select Pacific Northwest stops, Goin brings his salmon advocacy to the front lines of a crucial fight—the battle for biggest dam removal project in U.S. history. Today the Elwha is more than fading memories; it's a river with a rebounding fishery that will never be forgotten. For more about the vid, visit thememoryoffish.com.

Truths will be revealed, inside your box

Riverbound anglers of earth, no doubt, love their flies. This is especially true for trout guys, who have more than most. The origins of this obsession can be traced back to the caddis hatch on River X. Around dark, the wriggling tent-winged insects begin to take flight. Around the same time, the trout in the river begin to get hungry. This isn’t a casual affair. Those rainbows and browns are generally well-fed, making them particularly particular; they want their caddis served just the right size, and delivered in just the right shade of smoky-whole-wheat. In order to procure a strike from the bastards, the savvy angler produces a box of highly-considered magic.

Andy Anderson's photography goes well beyond the flyfishing microcosm. And all of it is well worth a look. Here the lens is reversed and the renowned shooter shares some of his thoughts and philosophies about the art form to which he's dedicated his life. Presented by: YETI and Orvis.

A reporter's notebook

THE RED LIGHT ON MY DESK PHONE WAS BLINKING. I hate when it blinks first thing in the morning. It usually means somebody has called to tell me I’m stupid. People love to hate their local newspaper, and they love to call reporters and tell them about it. My voicemail is rarely good.