Daily Drake

With less than three months remaining, competition is fierce

Goatfish, grayling, giant trevally, brown trout, one “huuuuge sunfish,” and many, many more, this edition of the #DrakeMagBigYear has anglers around North America chasing an incredible diversity of fish species on the fly. Which as it were, is pretty much the point of the contest—explore beyond your typical spots, make everyday on the water fun, and catch new fish.

In 2008, the feds introduced a new flow-management regime at Yellowtail Dam designed to increase water levels at the Horseshoe Bend boat ramp in Wyoming. Since then eastern Montana's Bighorn River, on the downstream side, has been gushing—experiencing more days above 8,000 cfs than during the previous 40 years combined. A new report from the Bighorn River Alliance (BRA) details the resulting erosion of both wild trout habitat and economic opportunity in the region. This vid tells the story of those affected by the big water bumps.

Cooke Aquaculture found to be at fault for Puget Sound net-pen failure

Washington State just closed its investigation of the Cypress Island net-pen failure that caused hundreds of thousands of farmed Atlantic salmon to pour into Puget Sound last August. It found that Cooke’s gross negligence of the net pens caused their collapse and the subsequent escape.

Last year Sunshine State Gov. Rick Scott signed landmark legislation that called for a catch-all reservoir to be built below Lake Okeechobee in order to improve the spiraling health of the Everglades. Unfortunately, designs for the project recently submitted by the Water Management District don't do enough. And in short, experts say we need a lot more land to fix the problems.

Snake River angler comes up short

Poaching steelhead is a time honored tradition among degenerate anglers. But, hacking the tail off a B-run buck to comply with size restrictions is certainly a new technique.

With runs hovering in the hundreds, British Columbia's Thompson River steelhead have been in steady decline since the '90s. The imperiled stock hit a record low last fall, when returns were estimated at less than 200 fish. Despite the numbers, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (“DFO”) permitted commercial and First Nations gillnet chum salmon fisheries during peak steelhead migration.

This year's Fly Fishing Film Tour (F3T) won't be in Denver until March. Meantime, so you're not feeling too fish-porn parched, Trouts Fly Fishing is proud to announce the Throwback Thursday Fly Fishing Film Fest, presented by The Drake, Felt Soul Media, and our friends at F3T. 

Can commercial netting coexist with Columbia River salmon recovery?

A Pound net is a wall of netting that stretches from the shoreline out into a river, funneling fish into a compartment called the “heart,” where fish are trapped but not killed. The nets were once common on the Columbia River, but were banned in Washington State in 1936 for being too effective. Commercial fisherman Blair Peterson had petitioned Washington and Oregon for more than a decade to build a pound net on the Columbia as a monitoring tool. His efforts were dismissed until the Wild Fish Conservancy took notice.

“They saw what this trap was capable of, as a selective harvest tool, and they were able to play ball with the state where I wasn’t,” Peterson says. “WFC stepped in with the technology and resources to help.”