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Tom Morgan may be gone, but his philosophy isn’t.

Walk into the Bozeman offices of Tom Morgan Rodsmiths and an immaculate bamboo rod greets you. Natural yellow. Maroon wrappings. Agate guides. Fluid action. It’s stunning.

Can commercial netting coexist with Columbia River salmon recovery?

A Pound net is a wall of netting that stretches from the shoreline out into a river, funneling fish into a compartment called the “heart,” where fish are trapped but not killed. The nets were once common on the Columbia River, but were banned in Washington State in 1936 for being too effective. Commercial fisherman Blair Peterson had petitioned Washington and Oregon for more than a decade to build a pound net on the Columbia as a monitoring tool. His efforts were dismissed until the Wild Fish Conservancy took notice.

“They saw what this trap was capable of, as a selective harvest tool, and they were able to play ball with the state where I wasn’t,” Peterson says. “WFC stepped in with the technology and resources to help.”

From Alaska to the Keys, the on-the-water epidemic is real

It all started several decades ago in Alaska. I was a newbie guide, hoping to land a nice tip. So, when my clients asked if they could spend the morning bonking sockeye spawners, completely ignoring the egg-crazed bows bouncing off their waders, I obliged. The guys quickly reeled in their limits, but then refused to stop. That’s when I looked over and saw another sockeye cart-wheeling downstream, and that’s when I also noticed something odd. The client “playing” the fish was holding the rod by its detachable fighting butt, instead of by the cork handle. Before I could offer any guide-worthy advice, the whole setup launched out of his grip.

The African Tiger Jako Lucas Capt. Jack Productions

As the calendar year comes to an end, the folks behind the 2018 Fly Fishing Film Tour is just getting into gear. In the past few weeks the F3T has released trailers for Dubai on the Fly, 100 Miles, and Beyond the HorizonToday, we see a sneak peak into Jako Lucas's latest adventure to the heart of the jungle in search of African tigers.

BIG GEET GOTTA EAT!

The real story behind that giant trevally footage

Unless you've been living under a triggerfish for the past few months, you're likely one of the millions of viewers who've watched those incredible teasers of bird-eating giant trevally in the Seychelles, which hit the Interwebs on Oct. 26. The footage was captured by a four-person crew from the BBC's Natural History Unit during fall of 2015 and fall of 2016, as part of the group's four-year production of Blue Planet II—the much anticipated sequel to its 2001 Emmy-winning original.