The Unlimited Cool Science Stuff Thread

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stripstrike
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Re: The Unlimited Cool Science Stuff Thread

Post by stripstrike » Fri Sep 11, 2009 9:39 pm

"No, I'm not a pessimist. At some point the world shits on everybody. Pretending it ain't shit makes you an idiot, not an optimist." Justin's dad

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BigCliff
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Re: The Unlimited Cool Science Stuff Thread

Post by BigCliff » Fri Dec 18, 2009 9:30 am

Lethal fuck stabbing-
Bug powder causes male bedbugs to stab each other to death with their penises

Male bedbugs will schtup anything, and when they do, their stabby little penises can do great damage to one another. Female bedbugs have some "down there" armor that absorbs the punishing blows of the bedbug's love-spear, but males lack this protection. A pheromone discovered by a Swedish researcher can cause male bedbugs to kill each other with their penises through uncontrolled shagging:
According to lead researcher Camilla Ryne, bedbugs are notoriously undiscerning about who they mount, and are accustomed to stab their penis straight into another male's abdomen...
Males with blocked glands were mounted as often as other males, but for longer and suffered more wounds.

"This is the first time I've seen an alarm pheromone used as a sexual one," New Scientist quoted Ryne as saying.
http://www.boingboing.net/2009/12/17/bu ... =Google+UK
Buy better hooks and bourbon.

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jdub
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Re: The Unlimited Cool Science Stuff Thread

Post by jdub » Tue Feb 25, 2014 9:55 am

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/25/scien ... ience&_r=0
Since they arrived in the Great Lakes in the 1980s, two species of mussels the size of pistachios have spread to hundreds of lakes and rivers in 34 states and have done vast economic and ecological damage.

These silent invaders, the quagga and zebra mussels, have disrupted ecosystems by devouring phytoplankton, the foundation of the aquatic food web, and have clogged the water intakes and pipes of cities and towns, power plants, factories and even irrigated golf courses.

Now the mussels may have met their match: Daniel P. Molloy, an emeritus biologist at the New York State Museum in Albany and a self-described “Bronx boy who became fascinated by things living in water.”

Inspired by Rachel Carson’s “Silent Spring” in high school, Dr. Molloy, now 66, has long been a pioneer in the development of environmentally safe control agents to replace broad-spectrum chemical pesticides.

Leading a team at the museum’s Cambridge Field Research Laboratory in upstate New York, he discovered a bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A, that kills the mussels but appears to have little or no effect on other organisms.
Now we need one for New Zealand mud snails that infest the Verde and others.
"There will be days when the fishing is better than one's most optimistic forecast, others when it is far worse. Either is a gain over just staying home." Roderick Haig-Brown

http://utahstreamaccess.org/

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SnuffBox
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Re: The Unlimited Cool Science Stuff Thread

Post by SnuffBox » Sun Mar 02, 2014 7:14 pm

Sagittarius62 wrote:Spent some time talking to a biologist with the DEC, and we got on the subject of freshwater mussels. A sizable part of his work revolves around these creatures. He started talking about their reproductive adaptations. The larvae use fish hosts to develop, and move around a body of water, by clinging to their gill plates, fins, or in their digestive system, then eventually drop off in their new home. Some of them simply latch on to any fish that passes by, but some of them use unbelievably sophisticated mechanisms to lure a host, and I do mean lure. Check out this site for a few examples.
http://www.bogleech.com/bio-clampirism.html
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Check out this mimicry by the Villosa iris. What smallmouth bass could resist?
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Ha! That's funny... Barnhart was my advisor in grad school. Did my thesis on mussels, hence the handle. Studied the effects of suspended sediment on the attachment success of mussel larvae... just barely significant. My favorite part was getting paid to snorkel.

Speaking of mars:
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Genome
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Re: The Unlimited Cool Science Stuff Thread

Post by Genome » Mon Mar 03, 2014 8:38 am

Insane mimicry and with diversity, like the species that mimics a crayfish!!! Snuff, i know you just picked these guys to study cause you liked saying glochidia.

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Bears Fan
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Re: The Unlimited Cool Science Stuff Thread

Post by Bears Fan » Mon Mar 03, 2014 10:22 pm

"Some days you win, some you lose, and some get rained out." - Outcast

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Billy Baroo
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Re: The Unlimited Cool Science Stuff Thread

Post by Billy Baroo » Tue Mar 11, 2014 10:32 pm


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T.J. Brayshaw
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Re: The Unlimited Cool Science Stuff Thread

Post by T.J. Brayshaw » Wed Mar 12, 2014 5:27 am

Domestication is associated with reduced burst swimming performance and increased body size in clonal rainbow trout lines

"Fish managers want the biggest bang for their buck," she said. "But if increased size is a tradeoff of sprint speed, as our data show, then we assume hatchery fish are being picked off by predators due to their slower speed, which makes the process of supplementing native fish with hatchery fish an inefficient tool for conservation and a waste of money."


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 104913.htm

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T.J. Brayshaw
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Re: The Unlimited Cool Science Stuff Thread

Post by T.J. Brayshaw » Fri Mar 14, 2014 5:51 am

Populations of endangered salmonids are supported by releasing large quantities of hatchery-reared fish, but the fisheries' catches have continued to decrease. Earlier research has shown that certain behavioural traits explain individual differences in how fish survive in the wild. A new Finnish study conducted on brown trout now shows that there are predictable individual differences in behavioural traits, like activity, tendency to explore new surroundings and stress tolerance. Furthermore, certain individual differences were observed to contain heritable components.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 092219.htm

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