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User avatar
By kish
#624404
Congrats on reaching such a cool goal! :cool

Dumb question from a not very trouty guy: are there other types of trout in those specific stretches of stream, or is it pretty much only your target species?
User avatar
By TX.
#624409
Nice!
So what differentiates the actual strain?
They all look like redbands to me (not being a smartass).
Is it visible by eye, or only scientific dna shit?
User avatar
By Transylwader
#624414
Well played Tructa! I got a reminder on my calendar today, GTW season opener tomorrow. You going? Double damn!
User avatar
By CarpeTructa
#624492
kish wrote:Dumb question from a not very trouty guy: are there other types of trout in those specific stretches of stream, or is it pretty much only your target species?
TX. wrote:So what differentiates the actual strain?
They all look like redbands to me (not being a smartass).
Is it visible by eye, or only scientific dna shit?
As far as I know, only the target species, but for some of the other natives you can find a mix.
Presumably, DNA - but we have seen how that is making things harder to classify or find 'pure' strains (e.g. greenbacks). However, the DFG for the most part has designated certain watersheds with the 'purist' fish that can still be found where they were before the influence of man and you have to catch these in one of those areas to qualify. For example, you can find the California golden trout in a number of high elevation lakes in CA that may have lived there for 100 years or more since being transplanted, but they don't count unless they have been found to be native to that particular lake/watershed.
I've now caught 7 of the 11 native species and will be backpacking for an eighth this fall. One of the 11 is so endangered that you can't legally fish for it anywhere in the state.
User avatar
By TX.
#624494
CarpeTructa wrote:
kish wrote:Dumb question from a not very trouty guy: are there other types of trout in those specific stretches of stream, or is it pretty much only your target species?
TX. wrote:So what differentiates the actual strain?
They all look like redbands to me (not being a smartass).
Is it visible by eye, or only scientific dna shit?
As far as I know, only the target species, but for some of the other natives you can find a mix.
Presumably, DNA - but we have seen how that is making things harder to classify or find 'pure' strains (e.g. greenbacks). However, the DFG for the most part has designated certain watersheds with the 'purist' fish that can still be found where they were before the influence of man and you have to catch these in one of those areas to qualify. For example, you can find the California golden trout in a number of high elevation lakes in CA that may have lived there for 100 years or more since being transplanted, but they don't count unless they have been found to be native to that particular lake/watershed.
I've now caught 7 of the 11 native species and will be backpacking for an eighth this fall. One of the 11 is so endangered that you can't legally fish for it anywhere in the state.
Very cool.
There is a trout native to Texas in the west, I believe it's an Apache strain. Not allowed to fish them either. Whoduthunk?
Never researched much beyond that.
User avatar
By fly-chucker
#624505
Oh hell yea! :Roll Eyes
User avatar
By The Wandering Blues
#624526
[report]




Been out on the road for while, but it's always good to have a place to call home. For us, that's now New Mexico. My new [i]home water[/i] is 50 miles away. I see it every day from our living room window and it haunts me. I've been up there and fished it hard 4 previous times, with only a 4" wild bow to show for the effort.



Quite frankly, I was beginning to wonder if it was worth having purchased my NM fishing license, although the hikes have been majestic. But, being back in Albuquerque to install a new kitchen, and living the urban life, had me jonesing to throw a fly. So, off to the Caldera for some more shaming. Or not....



Got up predawn and headed north, stopping along the way for some fortification. Any eatery worth stopping at was closed, so I was reduced to gas station fare.

[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_194.jpeg[/img]



The drive up to my target water is pretty amazing, passing through several Pueblos before heading up a canyon onto the plateau.

[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_195.jpeg[/img]



I got to my put in, geared up, and started the trek to the water. It was a nice 1/2 hike to a cliff wall, then a fairly sketchy descent into a canyon, where the water lay. Plenty of sledding on the arse. But, once on the water, it felt like home...

[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_197.jpeg[/img]



Didn't take long to be rewarded either, with a fat little 10" bow putting the bend on the 3wt. This water is considered to be a brown trout fishery, so I'm guessing this fella was a holdover from a lake about 3 miles up.

[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_196.jpeg[/img]



After that, it was 100% Mr. Brown. I was surprised to see a few decent caddis coming off, along with midges and BWO's. The water here is spring fed and filtered through volcanic strata, so it's mineral rich and fertile for insects. I tied on an orange stimmie with a midge dropper and had both whacked until the tree gods demanded reparation. After that, it was a size 14 elk hair caddis for the rest of the session. In 3 hours, I managed perhaps 2 dozen to hand in the 8-12" range. They were fat, fiesty, blue line, wild fish- just what I love.

[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_198.jpeg[/img]



[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_200.jpeg[/img]



[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_199.jpeg[/img]



The last fish was the best of the session. And even though there was still plenty of water to discover, I decided to call it a day on a high note.

[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_201.jpeg[/img]



After that, it was your typical, boring drive home... :coffee

[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_202.jpeg[/img]



[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_203.jpeg[/img]



[img]http://i932.photobucket.com/albums/ad165/WanderingBlues/Mobile%20Uploads/image_204.jpeg[/img]



Til next time....[/report]
Last edited by The Wandering Blues on Mon Jul 11, 2016 4:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By kish
#624529
Damn! Nice place to call home.
User avatar
By LA Fly Guy
#624546
Yep, that's pretty damn good.
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