This forum is for general topics. Keep all posts, images, etc safe for those who read the forum at work. Post only that content that you'd want your mama to read. Violators will be banned.
#699059
peetso wrote:Motherfucking Mustelids

Heero, were those wild caught or pen raised birds?
They are homers, well bred (for the most part - some mongrel genetics in there). All of them were born in one of my lofts and most have flown home from 100 miles away and with many tosses beneath an angry chicken, to boot. They would beat me home from that distance most of the time, also - release them 100 miles away, hop in car, see if I can make it back before them, and, nope, there they are sitting on the loft or gone back in.

That is my flier loft (they breed some in there, too), my breeder/prisoner loft is still ok. Ill get 12-15 more young to train this summer, I would guess, maybe more. My chickener friends are all helping me out - we have all been thru setbacks nd help when we can - so I have around another 20 or so young birds to train to home to my loft that I'll pick up next week, along with a few more in a couple months. There is always attrition - they dont come back, they get killed, etc. - but for the first time in a few years I had a solid loft full of solid fliers, all capable of flying under angry chickens for training, with some additional, solid, young birds homing 10-15 miles in the beginning of training.

Now I am back to starting over. It really stinks. Luckily, I am starting a new chicken this year. The last one would kill inexperienced pigeons with ease. She would refuse perfect grouse flushes hoping for pigeons. My fault (not entirely, maybe not mostly -- stupid hand-me-downs, never again) in training. New chicken, new pigeons - they will develop together.

I see you are training a new pointing dog in the dog topic. Homers are the way to go. They are reusable. You are behind the curve, tho, as even if you can build a loft today, get some squeakers that you can imprint on your loft tomorrow, you are still looking at a minimum of a few months before you have reliable fliers that you can put to sleep or put in a bird launcher anywhere other than your yard or very close and expect to get them back.

Your best bet, in addition to getting a homer loft going, if you want to really train your pointer is to find a source of feral barn pigeons. Either by purchasing them or by knocking on the owner's door of every barn where you see pigeons hanging out around to ask if you can trap the pigeons in the barn. This is how I get my kill birds, for shooting or for tossing under angry chickens to reward good position and flying. They are not reusable, even if you are not using them as kill birds, but they do fly better than most game farm game birds - especially the chukars - and the last thing you want is your dog catching the birds that it is supposed to be pointing because they dont fly.

Short of training hard with pigeons, your pointer will figure it out if you just show him enough wild game. Things will speed up if you take him out with other, steady dogs. They learn. It will be slower and longer before you get a steady, reliable hunter going this way IMO without A LOT of wild birds and successes and learning.

I am on the list for another litter that should be ready to come home in early Sept. The dog that fell thru I would have been training this winter and I *think* might have been out towards the end of the chickening doing actual hunting with my older mongrel. The pup from this new litter will really only start serious training toward the end of the chickening season - no real chance of serious of hunting . I am more excited about this new litter, tho, so maybe it was for the best. Plus my pigeon situation is gunna be rough this year. Le sigh.
#699063
Heero[CntRmbrPwd] wrote: Tue May 19, 2020 10:56 pm

They are homers, well bred (for the most part - some mongrel genetics in there). All of them were born in one of my lofts and most have flown home from 100 miles away and with many tosses beneath an angry chicken, to boot. They would beat me home from that distance most of the time, also - release them 100 miles away, hop in car, see if I can make it back before them, and, nope, there they are sitting on the loft or gone back in.

That is my flier loft (they breed some in there, too), my breeder/prisoner loft is still ok. Ill get 12-15 more young to train this summer, I would guess, maybe more. My chickener friends are all helping me out - we have all been thru setbacks nd help when we can - so I have around another 20 or so young birds to train to home to my loft that I'll pick up next week, along with a few more in a couple months. There is always attrition - they dont come back, they get killed, etc. - but for the first time in a few years I had a solid loft full of solid fliers, all capable of flying under angry chickens for training, with some additional, solid, young birds homing 10-15 miles in the beginning of training.

Now I am back to starting over. It really stinks. Luckily, I am starting a new chicken this year. The last one would kill inexperienced pigeons with ease. She would refuse perfect grouse flushes hoping for pigeons. My fault (not entirely, maybe not mostly -- stupid hand-me-downs, never again) in training. New chicken, new pigeons - they will develop together.
I am now recently very interested and concerned with pigeons . . . my wife less so. Expect your PMs to be filled with pigeons questions from me.

I read an article a while back about all these old timers in England who haven't much to do and lack mobility so they keep and race these pigeons all over the country. Fascinating birds really, but until recently I rather ignorantly just considered them only a pest.

I see you are training a new pointing dog in the dog topic. Homers are the way to go. They are reusable. You are behind the curve, tho, as even if you can build a loft today, get some squeakers that you can imprint on your loft tomorrow, you are still looking at a minimum of a few months before you have reliable fliers that you can put to sleep or put in a bird launcher anywhere other than your yard or very close and expect to get them back.

Your best bet, in addition to getting a homer loft going, if you want to really train your pointer is to find a source of feral barn pigeons. Either by purchasing them or by knocking on the owner's door of every barn where you see pigeons hanging out around to ask if you can trap the pigeons in the barn. This is how I get my kill birds, for shooting or for tossing under angry chickens to reward good position and flying. They are not reusable, even if you are not using them as kill birds, but they do fly better than most game farm game birds - especially the chukars - and the last thing you want is your dog catching the birds that it is supposed to be pointing because they dont fly.

Short of training hard with pigeons, your pointer will figure it out if you just show him enough wild game. Things will speed up if you take him out with other, steady dogs. They learn. It will be slower and longer before you get a steady, reliable hunter going this way IMO without A LOT of wild birds and successes and learning.


I think I'm probably the only guy with a pointing dog within a 100 mile radius so getting him on with older dogs will be a challenge. Getting him into lots of live birds will be tough also, because we are in the middle of a downturn in the grouse cycle up here right now.

The training method I'm leaning to suggests using wild caught pigeons for the exact reasons you pointed out, and like you say I am little behind the curve on developing my own homers. I think with all the grain farming up here, getting and trapping wild birds shouldn't be too hard, but then again I know nothing about this. I did manage to find someone close enough by who has wild pigeons for sale, so that's how we will start I think.


I am on the list for another litter that should be ready to come home in early Sept. The dog that fell thru I would have been training this winter and I *think* might have been out towards the end of the chickening doing actual hunting with my older mongrel. The pup from this new litter will really only start serious training toward the end of the chickening season - no real chance of serious of hunting . I am more excited about this new litter, tho, so maybe it was for the best. Plus my pigeon situation is gunna be rough this year. Le sigh.

Yeah its a bummer but once you get this new pup though, you'll always be thankful that the other one fell through. Doesn't help your pigeon situation though. Hopefully the winds turn in your favour here now.

What flavour of pup are you after?
#699064
Pigeons are really neat birds. I started keeping them as just a means to an end, but I have come to really enjoy them. Not just the training - just sitting on my deck, watching the flock fly around and do pigeon stuff. I have often thought about getting into the pigeon racing myself as there is a club here in the area but I haven’t taken the leap yet and won’t for a while longer now. They race their birds from as far as 500 miles away. It’s amazing.

I settled on a vizsla. They are the original falconry pointer with Magyar depictions the dogs with falconers atop horseback date to at least the 10th century and earlier. It’s a romantic notion, tho, as while they certainly have some of those genetics, they are been bred with German dogs and others thru the ages. Plus I like the way they look!

Last litter was hunting lines. Parents had good hunting drive and the dogs looked good. This litter are field trial lines - they compete in the horseback field trials against the e pointers, setters and German shorthairs and take their fair share of wins. I am looking at a dog that is going to run big, really big, with an extreme drive to hunt. Wie excite.

I don’t see many or even any of the munsterlanders here, but I know they have become quite popular in Canada and are being run by quite a few falconers. Good reputation.
#699067
idk a good darn thing about bird dogs or pigeons or chickens or chicken dogs or pigeoning chickens but I'm enjoying reading this. Lately it's become abundantly clear I require a few less mainstream hobbies and pigeon racing certainly seems to fit the bill.

In WA everyone just shoots their grouse out of trees and on the ground with a deer rifle. The alabama of the northwest. Is what I call it.
#699068
My goal is to replace this forum with a pigeon messaging system. We will all exchange pigeons and then when we want to send each other messages we will tie a message on the leg of one of the recipients pigeons and send it off.

There are some new technological improvements in pigeon racing these days, notably GPS leg bands that will track the bird’s flight path. Not real time where it can be checked to see where the bird is, but downloaded when the bird gets back. The fellow that runs the club here has tracked his birds returning home from Idaho flying at over 11k’ elevation going over 70mph over the mountain ranges in between. Super neat.
#699074
stillsteamin wrote: Wed May 20, 2020 9:37 am In WA everyone just shoots their grouse out of trees and on the ground with a deer rifle. The alabama of the northwest. Is what I call it.
Same up here in Northern Alberta. They have no idea the magic they're missing. Shooting one on the wing is akin getting a steelhead on the swing or a 10 pound brown on #20 dry.

Quality over quantity.

You can fuck 5 Two's I suppose but I'd rather go to bed with 1 Ten.

(I suppose getting one with a dog and an angry chicken would be the equivalent of banging Emily Ratajkowski)
#699076
Heero[CntRmbrPwd] wrote: Wed May 20, 2020 8:44 am Pigeons are really neat birds. I started keeping them as just a means to an end, but I have come to really enjoy them. Not just the training - just sitting on my deck, watching the flock fly around and do pigeon stuff. I have often thought about getting into the pigeon racing myself as there is a club here in the area but I haven’t taken the leap yet and won’t for a while longer now. They race their birds from as far as 500 miles away. It’s amazing.

I settled on a vizsla. They are the original falconry pointer with Magyar depictions the dogs with falconers atop horseback date to at least the 10th century and earlier. It’s a romantic notion, tho, as while they certainly have some of those genetics, they are been bred with German dogs and others thru the ages. Plus I like the way they look!

Last litter was hunting lines. Parents had good hunting drive and the dogs looked good. This litter are field trial lines - they compete in the horseback field trials against the e pointers, setters and German shorthairs and take their fair share of wins. I am looking at a dog that is going to run big, really big, with an extreme drive to hunt. Wie excite.

I don’t see many or even any of the munsterlanders here, but I know they have become quite popular in Canada and are being run by quite a few falconers. Good reputation.

Them Vizslas is beautiful dogs. That was my wife's pick out of all the pointing breeds but up here in the thick bush I need something thats going to work a little closer and tolerate the cold, (possibly why you see the Small Munster gaining popularity up here) so she got vetoed on that one.
#699095
sucks abouts yur birds hero
looks like the perps been dealt with
whole damn coop on a trailer fell on Mr Breer and the dean of the green passed on
good dude
tell ya what he thought
whether ya wanted to hear it or not
I admire that in him and the op
23 years of the birds today
that's a lot of days
good things shes
  • 1
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 18
Thumbing Through Some SBSs

Hot Orange Bumble-Hog https://live.staticfli[…]

Dear Capt Dustin Huff

Has anyone seen a photo of Mike recently? He look[…]

The Beer, The Wine, The Whiskey

I very much liked -The trouts -The brunette in[…]

Shakedown: TR

Nice chuck box. Looks like a most excellent trip.[…]

Subscribe to The Drake Magazine