Monthly photo contests will be the feature of this forum. Discussions of photographic techniques, gear, software, etc will (hopefully) discussed here.
User avatar
By nympho
#160998
Got this new Olympus stylus 850SW a couple months ago. Some of you bastards make me really jealous of the pics you get. Framing the pic isn't a problem, but getting great detail and leveling the light just isn't happening. Tried taking pics of a couple bugs- not happening either. My owner's manual doesn't give any clues as to how to take advantage of the macro- just how to turn it on. This has probably been covered in depth somewhere before, but I don't remember seeing it and I'm too damned lazy to look for it.

Could use a little tutorial over here. Anyone feel like helping?
User avatar
By LTD
#161000
I would also be interested in some input on this subject. I love the macro stuff and would like to learn more about it.
User avatar
By Outcast
#161071
I've got the same camera and haven't completely got the macro stuff figured out yet either. I've taken a shitload of macro shots and have gotten a few flowers and bugs to turn out ok.

My suggestion would be to just keep pressing the shutter button as often as possible and if you get shit, delete it. That's the beauty of digital. Fuck ups are free (except for time).

You could also try pressing "up" on the cross toggle after you get the camera into macro mode which will give you a few choices on exposure comp.

Lighting seems to be the absolute key. Also the camera won't let you get TOO close. If you are trying to fill the whole frame with a size 18 bug forget it. If you do figure out how please, please tell me how you did it.

I have also had a lot of problems with indoor macro shots (flies). I just can't get the lighting right for the camera to acheive proper focus. I've even tried it with a tripod and using the timer so as not to jiggle the camera when pressing the shutter button, no dice.
User avatar
By Rhyacophila
#161101
Be it said in advance that I am no expert in photography, be it film or digital format.

Some things I do that help are:

Turn off the flash

Use the zoom to help fill the screen, I usually zoom in between 10 and 30 percent of my allowable zoom (I think this is the optical zoom, I dont use the other (digital zoom at all - I may have the terms backwards).

When I try to focus on the fly in a vice, I usually place a sheet of paper right behind the fly (I mean pressed right up against the fly), this allows the camera to focus at the correct distance.

Sometimes I can see in my LCD which part of the fly will be in focus and can move the camera slightly, while holding the shutter switch in the prefocus mode, to make sure I get the parts of interest in the best focus.

Sometimes focusing on the jaws is sufficient to get the right depth of focus, esp. with tiny flies.

Outdoors, I'll try similar stuff, focusing on a leaf or stick that a bug might be sitting on, rather than trying to get the insect itself in focus.

Flash would have just drown these out
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Every once in a while I get a nice shot
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I'd love to hear from the guys who get those great images how they do it.

I imagine they use a manual focus camera.
By alanthealan
#161104
Don't use that model, but

If the camera dosen't have a supermacro setting allowing me to be close to the subject, I use the macro setting (usually a flower icon) and experiment with the distance and zoom until the camera focuses. Sometimes I am three feet away, but I "get in close" with the zoom. If its a busy background you have to manually focus. Tripods help.



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User avatar
By woolly bugger
#161121
I have a friend who has the 790 and he was also having issues with the macro mode. I've got the 1030 and it has better macro and supermacro. The Olympus doesn't focus very quickly in the macro mode and tends to look for highlight to focus on. Lots of light helps, if shooting flies on a vice use a tripod...

I would "practice" at home with some "bugs" or other "macro" subjects, so you can get the camera to function as you like, while not fumbling around with fish, mayflies, rod all while standing mid-stream...

good luck... it's a process .. some cameras (not olympus) have a zoom focus check button which is really nice... The waterproof olympus camera are a compromise at best. I've dunked two other cameras in the stream,

the brown drake was shot by my fiend with his camera, I not sure what brand, but the macro focus blew me away in terms of speed and the zoom focus check!
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790 macro instructions....
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User avatar
By Ramcatt
#161137
i'm old school and use a 720SW

crank up image quality and crop the photo--- best thing i found
its hard to get the goods with a point and shoot

but the SW features are unreal
User avatar
By nympho
#161209
Ramcatt wrote:
but the SW features are unreal
OK, call me an idiot. But what are the SW features?
User avatar
By Ramcatt
#161215
nympho wrote:
Ramcatt wrote:
but the SW features are unreal
OK, call me an idiot. But what are the SW features?
Shockproof
Waterproof

when i got my 720 a few years back it was really the only Point and shoot with these options with quality images... i can't speak enough about these cameras
mine takes a beating and still runs strong

these have been up before... but all with 720
dog is with macro
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User avatar
By E. Subvaria
#161260
ON those cameras you must enable the macro by pressing the "flower" icon on the back of the camera.

I prefer to use the super macro with light feature while the camera is in macro mode with rapid shot set.

The macro on those point shoots is A grade however I understand the user interface to be a bit tricky. The Olympus cameras are advanced use unlike a canon or a nikon that you cannot even turn the flash off.

I also suggest cropping the image on your LCD screen properly prior to pushing the button to take the photo.

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User avatar
By Ginseng Sullivan
#161290
typically anything really great macro wise is done with a SLR camera with a designated macro lens. obviously it's possible with the p&s cams but more of an issue to get consistant results. that being said i'm mainly talking about really small objects like mayflies and such. for your basic close up of a flower or something more like a couple of inches in size the p&s cams just set to macro and letting the cam do everything will get good results.

with tiny stuff the two biggest factors are camera shake and lighting. using a tripod takes care of shake but it hard to do in the field with insects that refuse to sit still. a higher shutter speed can deal with most cam shake but that requires enough light to get shutter speed fast. the other thing working against you is the f stop or what will determine how deep the focus area is. the closer you are the smaller the depth of field becomes and therefore you need a higher number fstop (smaller appeture) to cover the subject in focus. this also slows the shutter to get enough light which then causes blurred pics due to cam shake if not tripoded.

the answer to doing this in the field is a flash and a camera that can be used in manual mode so the photog can choose the correct shutter speed and f stop. typically you need f 16 or so to cover a mayfly full frame and about 1/250th shutter speed minimum to hand hold. the next step is dialing in the correct amount of flash power to get good coverage but not blow out bright areas and also possibly diffusing (muting) the flash to soften the light. once you know your cams settings you can easily and quickly set this up in the field to get that killer green drake shot or whatever. just like anything else, practicing and getting to know your equip. is the key to getting it done under adverse conditions in the field, where it counts.

realizing that i probably caused more confusion that helped with that i would be happy to answer any specific questions.


Image

nikon d70 nikkor 105 micro lens f16 1/500th on board flash set to -1 full frame (not cropped) #24 trico on the water (maybe 3/16" body lenght).
User avatar
By LTD
#161305
Ginseng Sullivan wrote:typically anything really great macro wise is done with a SLR camera with a designated macro lens. obviously it's possible with the p&s cams but more of an issue to get consistant results. that being said i'm mainly talking about really small objects like mayflies and such. for your basic close up of a flower or something more like a couple of inches in size the p&s cams just set to macro and letting the cam do everything will get good results.

with tiny stuff the two biggest factors are camera shake and lighting. using a tripod takes care of shake but it hard to do in the field with insects that refuse to sit still. a higher shutter speed can deal with most cam shake but that requires enough light to get shutter speed fast. the other thing working against you is the f stop or what will determine how deep the focus area is. the closer you are the smaller the depth of field becomes and therefore you need a higher number fstop (smaller appeture) to cover the subject in focus. this also slows the shutter to get enough light which then causes blurred pics due to cam shake if not tripoded.

the answer to doing this in the field is a flash and a camera that can be used in manual mode so the photog can choose the correct shutter speed and f stop. typically you need f 16 or so to cover a mayfly full frame and about 1/250th shutter speed minimum to hand hold. the next step is dialing in the correct amount of flash power to get good coverage but not blow out bright areas and also possibly diffusing (muting) the flash to soften the light. once you know your cams settings you can easily and quickly set this up in the field to get that killer green drake shot or whatever. just like anything else, practicing and getting to know your equip. is the key to getting it done under adverse conditions in the field, where it counts.

realizing that i probably caused more confusion that helped with that i would be happy to answer any specific questions.


Image

nikon d70 nikkor 105 micro lens f16 1/500th on board flash set to -1 full frame (not cropped) #24 trico on the water (maybe 3/16" body lenght).
GS,
I have a nik d40 with the standard 18-55. What f setting would you start at as a general rule for the Macro shots?

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