Winter 2017 issue cover

A Cure for the Cold Season.
The Drake.
Winter '17.

Illinois carp, Argentine brookies, Texas redfish, New York stripers, Colorado cutthroat, Oregon steelhead, St. Lawrence pike, Honduras permit, speed-guiding in Alaska, those bird-eating GTs, three great books, white flies in Wisconsin, backcountry in the Smokies, winter on the Madison, and the tragic loss of one blue jacket.

Sun Sun

Midwest summers—despite what you may have seen in Ozark—are all about working streamers and popping surface patterns for oversized bronzebacks and ornery musky and pike. Third Year Fly Fisher's new teaser for "Summer Haze" captures the essence of both the region and the season. Shooting is scheduled to continue through 2018. Stay tuned for more. 

This past June I found myself walking the high-desert banks of Oregon's Deschutes River, searching for rising, thick-bodied redside trout.

After a flurry of mid-day salmonfly activity, we grabbed a streamside bite washed down with local craft brews and settled in for the much-anticipated evening rise. We'd enjoyed relative solitude most of the day but as the sun began descending we couldn't help but notice the rising dust cloud from trucks making their way toward our little piece of paradise.

The mighty chinook salmon, the largest of the Pacific salmon species, is shrinking, which is scary news for Southeast Alaska’s already-imperiled king stocks. Fisheries researchers from Alaska and Washington recently summarized 40 years of data taken from 85 king salmon populations from California to Alaska. The results show that the fish are both decreasing in size and maturing earlier.

Endorsed by Gov. Jay Inslee, a bill to phase out net-pen farming of Atlantic salmon in Washington waters made it through the state senate earlier this month. It's now headed to the House, where the state legislature will cast a final vote to potentially nix the nets via a phase-out period.

Portland General Electric in 2010 began operating a "Selective Water Withdrawal" tower above Round Butte Dam on central Oregon's Deschutes River. The ecology of the lower Deschutes, one of the West's premier flyfishing destinations, has suffered ever since. These ecological impacts, in turn, have negatively affected businesses and communities in north Central Oregon that rely on the river. This short vid explains how selective water withdrawal operations have impacted the community of Maupin, Oregon, and highlights the efforts of the Deschutes River Alliance to fight back.

 “In politics, nothing happens by accident. If it happens, you can bet it was planned that way.”
—Franklin D. Roosevelt

What a difference a year makes. Just over a year ago, the proposed Pebble Mine at the headwaters of the world’s largest wild salmon run located in Bristol Bay, Alaska was on its deathbed. Then the regime change led to a directive from new EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt last May to withdraw protections for the watershed against certain mining activities.