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Alaska

"This summer I had a single task: spread my mother’s ashes somewhere in Alaska. In May I set out, two black Labs in tow, with the idea of finding the ideal resting spot. I drove the 3,000 miles of the Al-Can Highway, my mom’s ashes bumping along somewhere among the camping gear, bags of dog food, and fly rods." - Dave Zoby reading from his Winter 2018 feature story, "Mosquitos & Char."

DYLAN MALFA ON THE TRUCKEE,ENJOYING HIS LUNCH BREAK. PHOTO BY JULIE BROWN.

Where waders don't go to die

The wader-repair department at Patagonia is a standalone, self-sustained operation in a hard-to-find corner of a 342,000-square-foot warehouse in Reno, Nevada, just steps from the rainbows, browns, and—as of last summer—native Lahontan cutthroat of the Truckee River. The department is little more than a series of temporary walls erected on the edge of the receiving dock and beneath eight-story-tall rafters, but it is a domain of its own.

Two Florida anglers who lost tens of thousands of dollars in fly shop inventory are now back in the hunt for a new business location after recovering most of their pilfered merchandise.

Rally For Dallys

This episode of the DrakeCast takes a deep dive into the seedy underworld of a fishy religion in the Ozarks. Think Deliverance but with john boats instead of canoes. And at the center of this aquatic orthodox are two deities: the almighty streamer and the holy brown trout. But these aren’t your typical streamers or browns. They’re way bigger, and according to the river’s disciples, way better. Today, we’re going to find out how this creed came to be and how these devotees in Northern Arkansas began breaking bread with those coveted monster browns. It’s a story of exploration, teamwork, and the effect that flyfishing can have on a town. but really, it’s an invitation to establish your own fishy religion.

Meet Jack Buccola — a 12-year-old angler from Bend, Oregon. In RA Beattie's new film, NexGen, we see the rivers of the American West unfold through Jack's eyes as he witnesses the impact of wildfires on his home waters, and explores new adventures on a road trip with his father, Ryan, friend, Judd Field, and Judd’s dad, Pete. Throughout the journey, Jack grows to appreciate the steelhead of the Northwest and the native cutthroat of the South Fork of the Snake River. It's easy to see why. NexGen premiers at the 2019 Fly Fishing Film Tour, which kicks off on Jan. 19, in Bozeman, Montana.