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Howler Bros

After a brief hiatus, The DrakeCast is back. This episode aims to answer one question: How did a band of fishing and surfing bums living in Virginia create an iconic Texan brand? To help tell this story we'll be assisted by musican and Howler Brothers cofounder, Andy Stepanian. Along the way, we'll also get to hear some of his music. Stick around.

Someone wise once said, "If we can't remember our past, we're doomed to repeat it." In Sage's latest Swing Season edit, Ghost of Steelhead Future, Ashland Fly Shop's Jon Hazlett also says something genius: "Abandon the river... abandon the fish... not this river!" Catch up with Jon as he time-machines back into an Atlantic salmon past and uncovers lessons about conserving our steelhead rivers for future generations.

"A flyfishing guide based in Colorado, Maddie Brenneman has followed her heart right into the life she’s designed for herself, but not without some trial and error. Constantly taking a long look at her own motivations and desires, she’s made sure that she’ll never look back and wonder, 'What if?'" Via the "Live More Now" series from BUFF.

Shot entirely in northern British Columbia, Alignment brings the worlds of steelheading and snowboarding together across a wintry season of discovery. The full-length film, below, features Eric Jackson, John Jackson, Curtis Ciszek, Darcy Bacha, and friends as they ride B.C.'s breathtaking mountains and swing its wild rivers in search of balance. Three months in the woods does a body, and mind, good. Via Vantage Cinema.

The proposal to keep Penns Creek’s wild trout wild faces a stocking truck full of opposition

Penns Creek, nestled in the gentle folds of the Pennsylvania Appalachians, is one of a kind. Not because of its history, or its hatches, or its scenery, even though it has all of the above, but because it has the kind of remarkable wild brown-trout population that only exists in two percent of streams in the state. Two percent—for a state that is second only to Alaska in miles of trout water. These rivers, designated as Class A, are at the center of a potentially precedent-setting struggle in Penn’s Woods.