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A TYPICAL JUNE MORNING ON A TYPICAL NEBRASKA I-80 LARGEMOUTH POND. PHOTO BY TOM BIE

Sowbellies and baseball in the Cornhusker State

Dawn comes early to southern Nebraska on the 16th of June. Nautical twilight, second of the earth's three twilight phases, begins before 5 a.m. in Kearney, a town of some 30,000 sitting just off I-80 about three hours west of Omaha. I stopped in Kearney last summer on my way to the College World Series (CWS), and though sunrise was still an hour away, temps were already inching toward 70 and the largemouth were hitting poppers on Kea Lake—conveniently wedged between the freeway and a Best Western with a poachable breakfast bar. After landing a couple fat 15-inchers from the shoreline lily pads, I threw my float-tube back in the truck, helped myself to some hotel waffles, and headed on down the highway.

ANDREW UCLES (FRONT), AND BRIAN GROSSENBACHER, ON THE SET IN MYANMAR. COURTESY HOT SNAKES MEDIA/ HISTORY CHANNEL

Facing the Beast with Brian Grossenbacher

If you've paid even the slightest attention to flyfishing media over the past two decades, then you've seen plenty of shots taken by Bozeman, Montana-based photographer Brian Grossenbacher. Whether shooting commercially for clients like Simms, Orvis, and Yeti, or editorially for this magazine and many others, Grossenbacher has made his name by being one of the most talented and dedicated professionals in the industry. But starting this spring, fans of BG will have the opportunity to watch him on the other side of the lens.

EMMA SANSOM, POINTING TO A CARP. GADSDEN, ALABAMA, SPRING 1863. PHOTO BY DAVID FRANCK

Statuary in the Southern Imagination

"What do we do with hundreds of Confederate monuments and related statuary across the United States? Americans face a challenge that might be called the mass curation of our public spaces, in light of contemporary sensibilities, yes, but just as important, in service of what has always been the truth." —Washington Post

COURTESY NRCS

The West may experience a lengthy runoff in 2019

While it's always tricky making May or June runoff predictions in March, Snotel data from around the West indicates that snowpack levels, especially in Southern Colorado, Southern Utah, and parts of California's Central Sierras, are poised in 2019 to create high flows or a long runoff season or both. Snotels—short for snow telemetry—are automated devices set up by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) at various locations and elevations throughout 11 western states to assist water managers in making predictions about runoff, reservoir levels, and potential flooding. There are currently more than 700 Snotel sites scattered across mostly high-alpine watersheds. If you've been on a high-elevation hike and seen what looks like an oversized pillow off in the woods—that's a Snotel. These pillows have pressure sensors; they don't really measure snow as much as they measure water content in the snow.

We've followed Chris Owens, Brian Jill, Thad Robinson and Jay Johnson onscreen, navigating gnarly fishing terrain and living to tell about it, for years. This month the well-vaccinated foursome brings the "Fish or Die" party to Animal Planet. "They are not survival experts, but these close friends are determined to work together and boldly follow their dreams to be the very first to fish some of the most uncharted waters left on Earth." FISH OR DIE premieres Sunday, April 21 at 10PM ET/ PT on Animal Planet.