Daily Drake

southd4Over the protests of conservation groups, federal land managers moved to open 11,160 acres of North Park for gas and oil drilling. According to the Denver Post, the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management—despite vows to emphasize conservation—decided the nation's need for domestic oil justified the decision.

Colorado-WillSwinging for the FishesIntrepid contributing editor/tequila connoisseur Will Rice blogs about a recent soggy weekend on the river. "I had walked for over a mile in the drizzling rain. I didn't know exactly what I was looking for. The sky was overcast and the low hanging clouds moved through the mountains on either side like specters. It was going to rain hard at some point. Hard. I continued walking. Stopping. Looking at water.

Urban_FishingUrban Fishing on Rebounding Rivers
National Geographic—The flyfisher wading this clear-flowing river scene could evoke mental images of Montana. Except this isn’t. "Instead of pines and mountains, the backdrop is a busy high street, with red double-decker buses, betting shops, and kebab houses. This river, the Wandle, runs through the middle of London. A similar scene unfolds in central Stockholm. Outside the Swedish Royal Palace, an angler carrying his heavily bent rod weaves between tourists and waterside hot dog sellers." This story is part of national Geographic's special series exploring the global water crisis.
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Fish_MarketFish Market Buckles to Social Media Call
Seattle, WA—As reported on sites such as Moldy Chum, Pike's Place Fish Market, in Seattle, WA, recently heeded the viral call of the masses, discontinuing its controversial carrying of wild Pacific Northwest steelhead. Pause for applause. "We've read your emails, we've taken in the conversations at the market, we've had sustainability representatives speak at our meetings, and we've asked the tough questions to our suppliers. Our commitment is to make a difference and we can do that on many fronts, the supply of our seafood being one."
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teds-montana-grillSteakhouse CEO Rabid for Rivers
Best known for serving prime steaks, George McKerrow Jr., 59—the CEO of Ted’s Montana Grill—is described as an avid, even rabid, fisherman. "It was around 1990 that I learned to flyfish, which changed my fishing forever. It was in Aspen, and we were fishing for rainbow and brown trout. From that point forward I knew that flyfishing would become the ultimate fishing experience for me...."
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Urban_FishingNational Geographic—The flyfisher wading this clear-flowing river scene could evoke mental images of Montana. Except this isn’t. "Instead of pines and mountains, the backdrop is a busy high street, with red double-decker buses, betting shops, and kebab houses. This river, the Wandle, runs through the middle of London. A similar scene unfolds in central Stockholm. Outside the Swedish Royal Palace, an angler carrying his heavily bent rod weaves between tourists and waterside hot dog sellers."

Fish_MarketSeattle, WA—As reported on sites such as Moldy Chum, Pike's Place Fish Market, in Seattle, WA, recently heeded the viral call of the masses, discontinuing its controversial carrying of wild Pacific Northwest steelhead. Pause for applause. "We've read your emails, we've taken in the conversations at the market, we've had sustainability representatives speak at our meetings, and we've asked the tough questions to our suppliers.

teds-montana-grillBest known for serving prime steaks, George McKerrow Jr., 59—the CEO of Ted’s Montana Grill—is described as an avid, even rabid, fisherman. "It was around 1990 that I learned to flyfish, which changed my fishing forever. It was in Aspen, and we were fishing for rainbow and brown trout.

chinook-salmon
San Francisco—Conservation and fishing groups say that they have notified the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Pacific Gas & Electric Company that court action is planned unless steps are taken this summer to protect the threatened Central Valley spring-run

7-elevenYosemite Falls vs. 7-Eleven
The Adventure Life—In an ultimate slurpee showdown, Yosemite Falls has unseated 7-Eleven as Slurpee King of the West. Recent springtime temps in Yosemite National Park triggered a natural phenomenon called frazil ice, a slurry of slush that flows like lava down Yosemite Creek. “It’s not snow, it’s not ice, it’s something in the middle,” says Ranger Victoria Mates. An episode of Yosemite Nature Notes explores the phenomenon.
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sexy-teacher-2National Trout Learning Center
Rochester, MN—With the support of both city and county officials and organizations like Trout Unlimited and the Minnesota Trout Association, a steering committee hopes build a $3.5 million permanent center for trout education. The center is being modeled after the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, which expects to see 100,000 visitors this year. Its official grand opening will be on June 19.
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erie_4Water Bump for WA Steelhead
Prescott, WA—Endangered wild steelhead now have a little more water in the Touchet River, thanks to the collaboration between a Prescott farmer and a conservation trust. Up to 3 cubic feet per second, or about 1.9 million gallons a day, of water is now protected permanently for steelhead and other fish, and landowner Melvin Talbott will keep growing wheat on his 385-acre farm under an agreement arranged by the Washington Water Trust. The effort is the largest purchase yet of water for instream flow restoration in the Walla Walla Basin.
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